EVENTS       MEDIA      ARTISTS      ABOUT     PRESS

July 26, 2015

Larry Arrington
Innovating Ether
Omni Commons, Oakland



A note from Larry: I am choosing this astrological form of periodizing global history-future-time as a technology to bypass dualist thought in all its modalities. The organizational tool of astrological ages is space as time and time as space in which the body is absorbed and absorbent. While I encourage you to familiarize yourself with the structure of astrological ages, I hesitate to share any specific texts about the shifting of ages as I find the discussion of the aquarian ideal of “freedom” still tethered to the problems of verticality and power of the age of pisces (a historical freedom is not freedom). Our notions of freedom are on distant horizons. We do not know what we are gazing at. We cannot imagine the kind of human beings society will produce within this 2000 year cycle, but we can play at their prefigurative forms.


ABOUT THE ARTIST:

LARRY ARRINGTON is a dancer, choreographer, and teacher whose choreography has been shown at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Z Space, The Lab, CounterPULSE, ODC, The Garage, Cell Space, Mama Calizo’s Voice Factory, Supperclub, backyards, living-rooms, and in New York at The American Realness Festival. She has been an artist in residence at Headlands Center for the Arts, CounterPULSE, Kunst STOFF Arts, the Garage, and through ODC’s Sandbox Series. She created/curates SQUART, a show that gathers artists to create spontaneous performance works. She has been a guest artist in the University of San Francisco’s Dance and Social Justice Department and for YBCA’s Bay Area Now Festival. She has a BFA in dance from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro where she focused on choreography, art, and gender studies. Her work has been supported by The MAP Fund, Rainin Foundation, Zellerbach Family Foundation, New Stages, Dancer’s Group Lighting Artist in Dance Grant, and Theatre Bay Area’s CA$H grant.




 




︎ ︎ ︎



Heavy Breathing ︎ 2018



Critical thinking often feels heady, abstract, and divorced from the body. How do conversations change when we are moving our bodies and out of breath? What new modes of thinking become possible?
Mark